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Using a light meter with a digital SLR


I want to start using a light meter, a Sekonic 308s. My issue and it's probably dumb but I have to ask anyway. ISO?When I use my film cameras I use the films ISO rating.Question, where due I get the ISO number when I am using my digital SLR?.

I have scoured the internet for answers to this question and all they ever say is use the films ISO rating with your light meter. I can find very little info on using my Sekonic with my digital camera.Thanks for any help in advance...

Comments (11)

You are going to need some more info. check google on using a light meter..

I do not know about the seconic. such as is it a incident ir reflective meter. a reflective is what the cameras have. it measures the light reflecting off of the subject. you aim it at the subject and read it. it will give, as all handheld meters do, and array of shutter speeds and fstops.



The incident meter works by putting some kind of off white or white cover(dome?) over the meter. this sometimes makes the meter a reflective or incident if the dome can be slide to the side. it is used by aiming the meter back at the camera from the same direction as the subject. you can when standing with your camera simply aim the meter behind you in the exact opposite direction as the subject to camera line. it works by measuring the light falling on the subject. the incident meters advantage is that it is not affected by the subject's color or the condition outside(beach, snow, front of house, etc)..

All handheld meters have one item that has to be accounted for. that is any items that affected the light going through the lens. I am speaking of any filter or extension tube or converters or bellows or anything else. these all affect the amount of light going through the lens and the meter does not know they are there. so you the user must add the difference in stops to any readings you get from the meter to arrive at a proper exposure. one other item that may have to be acounted for is the Tstop of the lens, not the fstop that you dial in.

This is the light transmission factor of the lens. the Tstop is another way of saying how effecient the lens is at passing light through it. do not assume the Tstop and Fstop of a lens(when a certain fstop is dialed in) is the same number. it very likely is not. you can find out the Tstop by simply shooing a scene, your backyard from a tripod, with a known shutter speed and fstop at what the camera says is the corect mid histogram setting then taking the pic and comparing it to the same shot using the the same shutter speed but the fstop from the handheld meter.

Use csx or pex. if the histograms are the same then the T and Fstop are the same. but if they are not then for every shot based on the handheld meter you will have to add/subtract a fudge factor to the handheld meter reading..

Taking a handheld metered shot is not a super easy task. it does have some advantages over the camera's meter especially if using a incident meter. but it is still not simple excercise. my advice is not to do it unless youneed to pass some time playing with it. like a lot of things it is going to take some time to be any good at using a handheld meter. and if you forget to do any of the conversion steps between a handheld and camera meter your shot is junk for exposure..

I have a handheld gossen incident/reflective meter and I seldom use it. the camera meter is fine if you know how to use properly. for any light meter handheld or camera the following is far more important. the user must know what the meter is doing how it is doing it why it makes certain decisions how it is processing the info and how it is presenting the info to the user. unless the preceding known by the user with confidence in all lighting conditions any consistant exposures will be difficult to come by...

Comment #1

Treagan wrote:.

When I use my film cameras I use the films ISO rating.Question, where due I get the ISO number when I am using my digital SLR?.

It depends on the type of your DSLR, see the manual for your camera. Just don't choose "Auto" ISO...

Comment #2

My camera shows the ISO in the viewfinder, on the top LCD when I hit the ISO button, and in the menus..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #3

Your D300 has an ISO setting, I'm willing to bet that that roughly corresponds to film ISO .

I'm pretty sure the D700 you're interested in also has this special ISO setting..

Canon has an ISO setting, as does Pentax (and pretty much every brand)...

Comment #4

Ok wow! You have a D700 AND a D300, AND (apparently) a photography business, yet you aren't aware of the ISO setting?.

?????????????????????..

Comment #5

Treagan wrote:.

Question, where due I get the ISO number when I am using my digital SLR?.

You own WHAT cameras? And you don't know about ISO settings???? RTFM...

Comment #6

Egordon99 wrote:.

Ok wow! You have a D700 AND a D300, AND (apparently) a photographybusiness, yet you aren't aware of the ISO setting?.

?????????????????????.

I am trying to figure that out also ......

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #7

Tony Sx wrote:.

Treagan wrote:.

Question, where due I get the ISO number when I am using my digital SLR?.

You own WHAT cameras? And you don't know about ISO settings???? RTFM..

Either a troll ... or just Hard-To-Believe !!!.

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #8

Press the button with ISO stamped on it This displays the setting in the top LCD (in menu turn off auto).

Though why you need a light meter for baffles me Unless your using studio or manual flashA camerasome lenseslights and eyesCreate your own stylehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/twaca/..

Comment #9

I can't quite believe it either. D300, D700, 1DMkIIn, And no idea how to see the ISO setting, much less set it? I thought I'd seen everything!.

I'll also assume that RTFM means nothing to the OP..

Press the big button with ISO written on it. Better still, READ THE MANUAL.

Amy..

Comment #10

Amypics wrote:.

I can't quite believe it either. D300, D700, 1DMkIIn, And no idea howto see the ISO setting, much less set it? I thought I'd seeneverything!.

I'll also assume that RTFM means nothing to the OP..

Press the big button with ISO written on it. Better still, READ THEMANUAL.

Amy.

If he is using a light meter, wouldn't he be setting the ISO and using the camera manually? Why meter if you are going to put the camera on auto?? Someone needs to spend more time learning his equipment than buying it...

Comment #11

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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