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Picture Image RAW vs JPEG
Can someone explain to me when should I take RAW vs JPEG pictures?.

Disadvantages? best practices?.

Thanks!LL/New York.

'Life is too short to take ugly pictures'..

Comments (7)

LL22 wrote:.

Can someone explain to me when should I take RAW vs JPEG pictures?.

Disadvantages? best practices?.

Thanks!LL/New York.

'Life is too short to take ugly pictures'.

I take only RAW. I see no reason to ever take JPeg. The only advantage to taking JPeg, IMO, is to keep a burst going longer before the buffer fills..

One of two people are going to do my post processing. Either an engineer who setup the camera's defaults or me on my computer. Sure, I can adjust those in-camera defaults, but it's a very limited piece of software..

IMO, it's like the old days of film. Either I can let the drugstore develope and print my film using their averaging print defaults, or I can do it in my darkroom, where I get what I choose and make my decisions as to how it comes out..

Even with slide film, we used to cull them as slides, then print them in the darkroom, either via reversal, Ciba, or internegative..

I think that most serious photographers shoot in RAW. The only reason I can imagine that they don't is possibly that they're somewhat computer illiterate and afraid to learn a new tool. I really don't mean that as an insult. Many older people are afraid of computers. They're the ones that proudly claim they're computer illiterate. Most community colleges offer extension courses for these people.



Cheers, Craig..

Comment #1

LL22 wrote:.

Can someone explain to me when should I take RAW vs JPEG pictures?.

You always take RAW. It's just a question of who will process the RAW. The JPEG that comes from the camera has had a one-size-fits-all type of processing applied to the RAW. The result is good, but not as best as it could be. If you process the RAW yourself you can produce a better image..

But this takes knowledge, skill, and experience. After all, it's not some school-kid that programmed the in-camera processing of the RAW. A lot of knowledge and experience has gone into it, which is why the resulting JPEG is usually acceptable to most people. If you're going to do better then you need at least as much knowledge as was given to the camera's computer. It takes a while to develop that knowledge, but once you do then the images you process yourself will be better than the images from the camera..

Just don't expect miracles overnight and be prepared to learn a lot...

Comment #2

Guidenet wrote:.

LL22 wrote:.

Can someone explain to me when should I take RAW vs JPEG pictures?.

Disadvantages? best practices?.

Thanks!LL/New York.

'Life is too short to take ugly pictures'.

I take only RAW. I see no reason to ever take JPeg. The onlyadvantage to taking JPeg, IMO, is to keep a burst going longer beforethe buffer fills..

One of two people are going to do my post processing. Either anengineer who setup the camera's defaults or me on my computer. Sure,I can adjust those in-camera defaults, but it's a very limited pieceof software..

IMO, it's like the old days of film. Either I can let the drugstoredevelope and print my film using their averaging print defaults, or Ican do it in my darkroom, where I get what I choose and make mydecisions as to how it comes out..

Even with slide film, we used to cull them as slides, then print themin the darkroom, either via reversal, Ciba, or internegative..

I think that most serious photographers shoot in RAW. The only reasonI can imagine that they don't is possibly that they're somewhatcomputer illiterate and afraid to learn a new tool. I really don'tmean that as an insult. Many older people are afraid of computers.They're the ones that proudly claim they're computer illiterate. Mostcommunity colleges offer extension courses for these people. Thenthey can learn the other half of photography they're missing..

And some professionals are willing to confess: go ahead and waste your time and shoot in RAW, it will make you feel better but won't result in better pictures !.

Http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/raw.htm.

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/w-photos/full resolution Canon S5 video http://www.filefactory.com/file/8e57cf..

Comment #3

Ken Rockwell's opinions are not worth much in my opinion. His opinion is that if you shoot JPEGs and aren't happy with the resulting image, don't bother with RAW, go straight to large format film. Nonsensical to say the least!.

Please have a read through my recent replies to this very same question..

In short shoot RAW + JPEG, try them both out and see which you prefer. If you are a perfectionist (or even if you only want the best your camera and lens can produce) you will stick with RAW. There is NOTHING wrong with JPEGs, it's just that RAW produces better images and has a lot more latitude to correct mistakes...

Comment #4

Bw100 wrote:.

And some professionals are willing to confess: go ahead and wasteyour time and shoot in RAW, it will make you feel better but won'tresult in better pictures !.

Http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/raw.htm.

Oldhiker wrote:.

Read this article. http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/tech/raw.html.

Ken Rockwell...oy. Forgive me if I dont put too much weight in the words of person who admits to not taking one good photograph after 15 years of photography..

If people dont want to or dont care to take the time needed to learn how to post process, that fine. But those people shouldnt go around telling others that hand processing of photographs isn't necessary. That is simply wrong. Despite all the science and technology we have available, the truth of the matter is that making a great photograph is more art than science..

At the very least, most photographs require different amounts of sharpening to different areas of the photograph. Processing has to be adjusted for content, and thats something that automated processing cant do..

If youre just taking snapshots of the kids or vacation, then sure, the JPEGs you get are probably good enough. But as a hobby, I dont see how anyone wouldnt want to go the extra mile on promising photographs to make them as good as possible...

Comment #5

And Ken Rockwell is an authority of what?.

Http://www.kenrockwell.com/nm/aliens/index.htm.

Cheers, Craig..

Comment #6

Chris59 has good advice, shoot RAW+jpeg and see which one you prefer.The only thing I would add is learn solid photography basic fundamentals firstlike exposure, compostion etc. because you need good images going inboth formats to get good results comming out. I like jpeg..

Http://dwayneoakes.zenfolio.com.

Take care Dwayne Oakes..

Comment #7

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