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non-dslr vs dslr in low light
Hi all,.

I think this has been asked once, but it pertained to slr vs. compact digital. Anyway, I'm just wondering, does dslr perform better in low light vs. non-dslr (ie, my Fuji s600fd) because they have a bigger sensor? I was browsing through flickr and I notice that many /img/avatar2.jpgs of dslr are able to shoot under low light with faster shutter speeds and lower ISOs..

M.K.http://www.flickr.com/photos/monkeyrpn/..

Comments (12)

You still need to bump up the sensitivity and have a fast lens or flash. A good flash and technique can make it all look natural and not harsh. Even at higher ISO settings larger sensors produce less noise and are quite well suited to shooting in poor light..

Here are a couple of shots with my K10D at ISO1600 Shutter 1/30 28mm f2.8 lens and no flash:.

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Unfortunately the K10D is not that clean at ISO1600 in the blue channel when you correct for WB by pushing that channel over a stop. I wish I had some white balanced lamps so I didn't have to do that..

As you can see I'm still shooting at 1/30 in a room with 2 40w incandescent bulbs. One useful feature is shake reduction which allows for lower shutter speeds not be blurred from hand shaking..

The sensors are not more sensitive, they are just cleaner at higher sensitivities and you can use a decent flash system with an SLR..

I shoot him without a flash as chinchillas have sensitive eyes and he hates the flash..

Regards,Tyr.

Finally got a gallery:http://picasaweb.google.com/tyr.francoperlak..

Comment #1

Monkeyrpn wrote:.

I was browsing through flickr and I notice that many ownersof dslr are able to shoot under low light with faster shutter speedsand lower ISOs..

To achieve fast shutter speed and low ISO in poor light requires a good lens having a wide aperture. Although the sensor in a DSLR is capable of performing well in low light, by increasing the ISO, to take full advantage, needs a wide aperture..

I emphasise this as many DSLRs sold as a kit with a general-purpose zoom lens will not necessarily achieve top quality results. If you are considering the purchase of a DSLR for low-light work it would be wise to take into account the additional cost of a suitable lens when allocating your budget.Regards,Peter..

Comment #2

Yes, all other things being equal, a DSLR will perform better in low light than a compact because the bigger sensor (about 10x bigger) collects more light - so the signal is bigger, needs less amplification, and hence the noise is correspondingly lower. On my DSLR, ISO800 gives excellent quality A4 prints where the noise is not visible unless you look very hard close up; ISO 1600 is also perfectly usable..

If you have a wide-aperture prime lens (like f/1.4 or f/1.8) which lets in much more light than a standard zoom (typically, f/4 - f/5.6) than you are even better equipped for low light work without flash - although there can be depth-of-field problems at wide paertures if you're not careful - if you focus on someone's eyes at f/1.4, and accidentally lean one inch forwards or back before taking the picture, the eyes will not be in sharp focus..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #3

If a tripod is not doable, then I feel I can hold a heavier DSLR somewhat more steady than a smaller camera body. For this reason (and for a more solid grip and more battery power), I also like a grip on the DSLR. Finally, the larger DSLR body usually provides a better three point hold for the camera (two hands and forehead). None of this is necessarily a deal breaker but every little bit helps.Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm..

Comment #4

AS helps to steady things. For higher ISO use, I recommend a 6MP Pentax. ISO 1600 is clean enough for posters and ISO 3200 is quite useable...

Comment #5

(Thought this sub-topic would be of interest to those reading under the original topic so I hope you don't mind posting this question here.).

I'm a newbie SLR user who, like many folks here, wants to take low light candid photos. The oft-repeated advice I'd seen is that an SLR with a fast lens is necessary for low light photos. Well, I now have a K100D and a FA 50 f1.4 lens. However, taking sharp low light photos is still very much a challenge because 1) the camera has a hard time with focus lock when the lens is wide open and light is low; 2) because of the very shallow DoF when shooting at such wide apertures, even a relatively small movement by the subject after focus lock puts the focus on the wrong part of the subject; and 3) when wide open the lens is softer than I'd like..

Pls. let me know if any of these observations are due to user error. Otherwise, are there any other techniques (or equipment) I should be aware of to improve my low-light photography? I do have a tripod but for the kind of candid photos I'd like to take, a tripod is not a practical option. I also have an external flash (AF-540FGZ) and I intend to learn about natural-looking flash photography..

Thanks in advance for sharing any advice/techniques...

Comment #6

Fast 50's will have a bit of a problem focusing in really low light. I actually prefer using my A28 or Zenitar 16. Shorter focal lengths are easier to handle in lower light and give better results. My Z16 @ F4 and 1/6 second without AS is not a problem. .

AS helps a lot and I may eventually "upgrade" to a K100D Super...

Comment #7

Hmm I didn't consider how important focal length is for low light. Glad to know you're getting good results with the Zenitar. I was interested in getting that lens in any case for ultrawide angle shots (and very reasonable cost  ). You've given me another very good reason to get it. Thanks!..

Comment #8

You bet! I bought one 2 years ago and it has been my most used lens. After that would be my A28/2.8 and Sigma 17-70. My F50/1.7 is an awesome lens but I consider it more of a portrait lens than for low light. I actually will take the Sigma zoom instead of the 50 because it will AF quickly when I can not get the 50 to AF at all...

Comment #9

- the K100d with the DA 40 f/2.8 Limited works great for me. It's sharp wide-open, and focuses very quickly. Does it help, in low-light, to be pointing at something with some contrast? Yes, but I really have little problem using this combo @ ISO1600 in low indoor light...

Comment #10

Low light photogarphy is my favorite..

With digital (after slide) I started with Olympus C-750UZ and got many images I liked. Still it has 16 sec exposure limitation and even at ISO 50 noise was annoying..

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My Minolta 7D is nost best long exposure DSLR, but granted me bunch of long exposure shots I love..

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Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #11

I like what I see from the DA40. The FA35/2 also looks to be great but in a much bigger yet still small package. Then there is the DA21, FA31 and FA43 in that range. Later, there will be the DA35 SDM, DA35 macro and DA55 SDM...

Comment #12

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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