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Before I ask my question, I want to ask: Hosting and Domain Transfers on GoDaddy.com?.

My main question is: 11/18/07 Buyers Offer: 150 USD.

11/18/07 Your Counter Offer: 25,000 USD.

Hey this is a great name not to be vain but 150.00?? please!.

You all know why I placed the high offer right?..

Comments (38)

Your question was: Hosting and Domain Transfers on GoDaddy.com?.

When I get those sort of replies , I get mad, so I quit the negotiations.

Some people like to think that asking much more than what they really want is the way to go, I hate it...

Comment #1

Sedo doesn't let me counter higher than $10K for some reason...

Comment #2

I see why you think that $150 is far to low, but $25k? If I were the buyer I would think you were jerking me around and I wouldnt even respond...

Comment #3

The buyer maybe probably someone here (or a domainer at least).... Kindly let us know if the sale succeeded..

So that we can all start selling our "crappy" LLLL at at least a K..

Comment #4

Yeah i'd say $150 is a joke of an offer, but your counter is insulting. Kudos if you were trying to piss off the buyer...

Comment #5

Don't like lowballs?.

Set a min price. Duh..

Comment #6

You've got to be kidding me right? $25k?.

Actually I think the offer was respectable, I would've probably.

Countered with $275-$300 to cover my Sedo fees..

Further I wouldnt be posting the name like this on HostGator forums.

Until a sale is completed.

Your call though!..

Comment #7

Although I agree $150 is a way too low offer, personally I would counter with something like $2,500 and hope to settle for around $1,500 and would not settle for anything less then at least $1,000.

High Google results, close to 400,000 here in Holland, and many companies using 'limt', of which this one looks the most promissing: http://www.limt.co.uk/.

Great name! Good luck..

Comment #8

I dont think the name is worth 1k honestly. I think it's worth $500 MAX in a year I can see $1k but the names just sold out, they arent a goldmine quite yet...

Comment #9

Agree with you on the price of $500 max at this moment, just ment that personally I would not let this one go for less then $1,000, even if I have to wait (and I probably have to) for a few years.

This is one of the better LLLL.com's I have seen...

Comment #10

You may have just scared off the best chance of selling it to an enduser ?

Why did'nt you just reply closer to the range you'de be willing to sell it for ?

...

Comment #11

This is excellent advice. It amazes me how many people ask in open forum for appraisals days before the name goes up for auction. They also make no effort to hide the name from search engines, like "somename.com" as opposed to "s o m e n a m e (dot) com" (spaces between letters). If your appraisal comes in at reg fee then you just shot yourself in the foot.

I also suggest refrain from commenting on sales afterwards, as a courtesy to the buyer. If it is public knowledge, like a TRAFFIC auction, then it is ok to list the sales price without comment on whether it was high or low for each domain.

Marc..

Comment #12

'cos he has no intention of selling, yet.

(just my guess)..

Comment #13

Or he wants more attention before starting an auction..

Comment #14

This thread is a great example of how not to do business. If I am a buyer & see someone asking for what they should sell a name for, I will think I have them right where I want them as they clearly do not have their own mind on value for their property.

Secondly if I get a ridiculous counter offer like that, I will just ignore it & chalk it up to a buyer being a jerk about it. Instead of feeling the person out & seeing what they would be willing to spend, you immediately convey to them that you don't take them seriously & they can piss off. Quite honestly the name is not a sure thing so you should take any offer you get seriously & go from there.

While your LLLL has good letters, it has no guarantee of being that money maker you want it to be. Most of the LLLL's I can guarantee will just end up trading hands for quite awhile. Banking on end users who might have companies to match letter combos is risky & a low % success rate at best.

I would seriously look into how you handle future offers or you could be screwing yourself over. If you don't want offers below a certain #, set a range so not to waste everyone's time...

Comment #15

I really was not interested in the offer and was also not willing to sell below X,XXXThe 25k really was not serious and I figured you would have caught on to that. I should have been more clear.Im not in a hurry to sell however. I was not planning to make a big debate over this and Im surprised it has escalated to such a level..

Anyway's forget about it...

Comment #16

Its a Forum...for discussions...is it not ?

...

Comment #17

1.) $150 is not a joke of an offer. Thats what I would begin negotiations at if I were buying this name. Keep in mind that the initial offer and the final price are always way apart..

2.) $25,000? Seriously, this will just tell the buyer that you don't want to sell the name, or have some really high expectations.

I don't think you'll get any response from the buyer. $150 is a very very reasonable starting offer for a LLLL.com.

I buy my names usually through email queries. I pay good prices, but when a seller counters my offer with something that is 25 times the name's worth, I just get pissed off and close negotiations. Don't treat every buyer as a jerk. I just sold a LN.com for high 2x,xxx, and the starting offer I got was what you would call a 'joke'.

I know many serious buyers who start off with $100 just to see if the owner is even interested in selling it, or if he has some super high expectations for it.

A $3500 counter would've been good, IMO..

Comment #18

I know it was not a serious counter but I was pointing out that such a counter is not good business. Quite honestly I'd be willing to wager you won't get $XXXX within the next 3-5 years unless you get an end user with the exact letters but that is just my opinion.

This still doesn't change the fact if you want a certain amount, list it with a minimum offer or don't list it at all. For all you know this buyer could have been your end user but wanted to feel you out. Now that process has been completely shot unless he chooses to call your bluff...

Comment #19

Just a couple of weeks ago I was interested on a name eolic(.)com at sedo (i own the org ext) I made an offer of 100 euros just to see what counter offer wasThey replied asking for 28500 euros.....

Comment #20

I would agree with that - IF the person that made the recent offer was the .co.uk or .net owner then you just screwed up the chance of a decent sale - Of course, we will never know that for sure.

Best of luck with it.

...

Comment #21

It's ok. But honestly I'm sorry I brought up this thread..

Comment #22

Let's hope the "bidder" is a genuine buyer and your "counter offer" get accepted.

Good Luck! cheers..

Comment #23

Actually the the transaction is closed. No sale as I expected..

I was not trying to start any free advet to the sale or anything and I hope I did not offend anyone for posting this thread as it was just supposed to be a fun post. In any case, I will refrain from posting these topics in the future..

Cheers!..

Comment #24

While I agree that hitting the buyer with a clearly overoptimistic counter generally might not seem the best way to do business, there is another side to this...

If you don't counter high, how are you ever going to find out if one of your domains actually might go at a very high price?.

Case in point: Yesonline sold a hand reg for 40K. He must have countered pretty damned high, a counter that would have been chided here, considering the name, which would have been appraised here at around low $xxx maybe. But he did sell it for $40K....

Here's the related forum post: http://www.namepros.com/2326579-post9.html.

And you can find the HostGator in question here: http://www.dnjournal.com/archive/dom...es10-23-07.htm.

I agree with most posters that one should counter close to what one is actually willing to sell the HostGator for, but I'm just wondering, how to spot that one buyer that really, really wants the domain?.

Just some food for thought...

I usually counter high-ish for all my domains, because I am generally not willing to sell any HostGator for less than 2K, and for the really good ones that I'm in no hurry to sell I almost always counter $xx,xxx. I don't mind if the other party cancels the negotiations. My high counter is a signal that this HostGator will not be sold cheap, and the cancellation is a sign that the buyer is not very motivated and is wasting my time anyhow.

Of course, clearance sales on forums is a different matter....other than that, I'm looking for end user sales mostly.

Cheers!.

Josh..

Comment #25

Please don't refrain as I saw the thread as a nice debate about how some feel about buying & selling. It is nice to hear what other peers are thinking as it could help someone on the fence about tactics & such.

GL with the name..

Comment #26

Limt.com - really nice name but value-wise, I struggle to see it sell for more than $500.

Good luck anyway..

Comment #27

In tdnam even worse you can get offers like 10 usd and 15 usd..

Really ridiculous offers.....

Comment #28

It would not exceed mid $XXX for sale value. But afterall, it's your name! Just name your price. The buyer offered $150..but thats initial offer, maybe negotiations could take price to double at least $300 which in that case a good sale price.

Wish you all the best..

Comment #29

Here's my thing. Your counter should always depend on how desperate you are to sell the name, and what are the chances of getting another offer for that name..

If I don't need the money, I will be more than happy to counter with 25 times the name's value, just to see if I get lucky. I don't care if the buyer runs away; I can afford to sit on the name for a few more years.

Now the name quality also decides the counter. If I have a LLL.com with a reseller price tag of 10k, and I get an offer for 15k, I will counter with 100k. Why? Because I know that if the buyer runs away, I can always find another one for a LLL.com.

But for a name like xyth.com, if I get a decent offer, I know that might be my only chance to sell it at a respectable price level.

You negotiation tactics should change with the quality of the name, your own personal financial situations.

One more thing: most people DON'T like to negotiate. It places them in a pressure situation, and they tend to avoid them. This can be played to your advantage. If you get even the slightest hint that the buyer is rich and willing to pay, you can get a higher price by simply canceling negotiations...more often than not, they'll come around if they want the name badly enough..

Works the same for sellers..

Comment #30

Understood. But to me when I first read it I thought you were jerking the bidder...

Comment #31

Nice posts of sashas and josh_1.

Gemstar isnt wrong but his counter offer was extremly high for sure as we know now it is a reseller.

He owns the name and you can ask the price you want for it, it can have consequences though... he can make the potential buyer close the deal or he can have a deal like Yesonline had.

Gemstar didnt know who was the buyer and I know about one sale that was a good name sold for a good price, however the buyer was a company that could have paid easily $xx,xxx and the sale was far from this.

But what we always read is that the price is given by you.

LLLL.com are probably the hottest thing now (i mean everybody wants to have one) and if it was an end-user the counter offer would be fair enough.

Maybe this thread will teach good things for all of us... we must be patient and take every (even the lowball ones) offer as a serious buyer..

Comment #32

Although I can understand someone being annoyed and somewhat offended at a low bid, from what ive read from other posts is that a potential buyer is not going to start too close the the price that their willing to pay, so as to leave room for negotiations.

By the way I dont know the prices of these particular domains (LLLL) but I think steady negotiation in any potential deal or at least a friendly but to the point message may be more ideal in many cases.

I understand that people dont have time to waste and can often end up disappointed when something leads to nothing but I think taking the polite approach and not taking a low offer too personally may be best.

Its absolutely not my business what anyone offers a HostGator for, but I think in long term and reputation and feel that handling each situation accordingly and calmly is important...

Comment #33

It is true that people dont have time to waste. But this HostGator will never ever be worth $25k at least this is the reason I think the seller made a big mistake when he countered with $25k..

Comment #34

Limit.com would probably be worth more than $25,000, but the discussion is about limt.com, which is a typo of limit.com. It is a good typo, but not $25,000 good.

Interesting to note that limit.com is being used for a county supervisor election. What a strange application! In any case, a typo of a site that is not commercial puts further limits (pun intended) on valuation.

Marc..

Comment #35

These are the type of prices we used to see alongside names on Afternic in the late '90s ... and nothing ever got sold.

Sorry but you're not doing any of us any favors by doing this.

.......

Comment #36

Maybe. Then again, an end user sale is always desirable. For an end user, brand name dotcom is valuable.

Personally I would not let go of my LLLL.coms for reseller prices. http://Limt.co.uk.

London Institute of Management & Technology http://limt.co.in/.

Lloyd Institute of Management and Technology(LIMT) http://www.limt.jp/.

Limt Vintage Clothing Online Shop..

Comment #37

When I get $100 - $150 offers on 3 character .com's, I may sometimes reply with $15k - $25k counters. I have no desire to enter into negotiations from such a low point, and that either flushes out a really interested buyer and they contact me via the whois, or tells the low-ballers to bugger-off.

You may hate it, but no more than I hate "You have received an offer!" messages only to find out it's an offer looking for a sucker as a seller.

-Allan..

Comment #38


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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