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choosing a camera
Hi! I'm looking to buy a slr camera that will hopefully last for a while. If the price isn't an issue, which camera would you recommend purchasing? I've heard that canon and nikon are the best, but there are so many options between them and wonder if getting the highest model is a safe buy, or a waste (for a beginning slr user?) Thanks for your help!..

Comments (20)

Hello, sparkiex!.

You shouldn't necessarily worry about what the best camera is - just what the best camera FOR YOU is. What are you looking for in a camera? What do you expect it to do for you? What features could you not live without? Which features don't really matter? Does the weight matter? The size? In-body or in-lens stabilization? Proprietary batteries or AA? Pentaprism or pentamirror viewfinder?.

What matters to YOU about those concerns will determine what camera you should choose..

Keep in mind, when you buy an SLR, you're buying into a system - you'll have to buy compatible lenses to your body and an external flash which may or may not have to be proprietary to get full functionality. Personally, I care more about the lenses I own than the body; I expect the body to get replaced, but I plan to keep my lenses for life..

Keitha McCallPentaxian and Shapshot Shooter since April 2007http://flickr.com/photos/aravis121/http://www.ascenicworld.com..

Comment #1

Since modern camera is not just mechanical equipment, but have plenty electronic details, you'll not find so reliable digital cameras as Pentax Asahi..

All DSLRS are capable of making high quality photos if equipped with good lenses, and exposure is right..

If you need weather sealed cameras, research Pentax K20D..

In terms of reliablity - it's about luck and your photography style..

Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #2

Hi Sparkie!.

Hm. Which is the best camera (for you) depends on what you like to do with it..

Do you have experience in photography?If so, what do/did you like to shoot?If no, what would you like to shoot?.

On travel? Or on location/studio?In the sun/rain?Landscape/Sport?Do you mind carrying a tripod? Or find it necessary?Will you print big?Do you mind buying used cameras/lenses/accessories?....

Jens.

'Well, 'Zooming with your feet' is usually a stupid thing as zoom rings are designed for hands.' (Me, 2006)My Homepage: http://www.JensRoesner.de..

Comment #3

Hi! Thanks for your quick reply. I've so far only used a point and shoot camera just to take photos of family events, vacations, etc..

I'm hoping to be able to take better pictures using an SLR camera...again, mostly just for vacations, family events, and occasional landscape pictures. So that being said, the lightness of the camera would be fairly important to me. Other than that, I'm not quite sure what all of the other questions you asked means...  ie. batteries, lenses, etc. So I guess something basic and easily portabe would owrk for me? Do you have any recommendations for these?.

ALso, I see sooooooo many lenses on the market. What are the basic lenses I should purchase to take photographs with an slr camera? Thanks in advance foroy our help!!..

Comment #4

Hi Jens,.

Thanks for your quick reply! I don't have much experience in photography except taking pictures of vacations and family events with a point and shoot camera. I'll probably take pictures of the same things, but I'd just like to be able to take better looking photos..

As I responded to another reply, I'm basically looking for an easily portable (ie. light) camera for basic photos of people and landscape..

I don't think that I will print big regularly. The biggest will probably be about 10x10 or so for scrapbooking purposes . As far as lenses and accessories, I don't particularly mind buying used... does it make a difference? (besides cost?).

As far as lenses go, which ones do you think are required (or good to have) for beginning photographers??.

Thanks for all your help!..

Comment #5

Ok, I get the picture (pun intended)..

IMO, you should either buy a new Nikon D40 with the twin lens kit. The second lens should have VR. That kit sells for between $550 and $600. Make sure that is a VR lens on the second one. The D40 is one of the easiest cameras in the world to learn and takes fantastic images right out of the box. No twiddling around..

The other choice would be an Olympus 420 or 510 with the twin lens kit. I like the 420 because of it's size, but the 510 has more features and includes stabalization. It should be slightly more than the D40. Olympus glass, like Nikon glass, is some of the best in the world..

I've seen other newbies buy so many other cameras and they often end up as dust collectors on the shelf. The two above will get used. They have great glass. They are terribly easy to use. Put your eye to the viewfinder and press the button. Great pics.

These two are not gimicks. They really work well and they are priced right.Cheers, Craig..

Comment #6

Hi folks!.

IMO, you should either buy a new Nikon D40 with the twin lens kit..

While it takes great pictures, the limited compatibility with older lenses and the rather strict meaning of "older" here, I am not sure this is the best suggestion. In any case, a prospective buyer should research these issues before jumping in..

The other choice would be an Olympus 420 or 510 with the twin lenskit. I like the 420 because of it's size, but the 510 has morefeatures and includes stabalization. It should be slightly more thanthe D40. Olympus glass, like Nikon glass, is some of the best in theworld..

There is not a company making bad lenses or bad cameras - you just have to pick the one that fits your and your application..

They are terribly easy to use..

Most dSLRs have automatic modes which make even a D300 easy to use..

Put your eye to the.

Small.

Viewfinder.

And press the button. Great pics..

No. That's not how photography works. Photography involves the photographer having skill. _All_ dSLRs produced in the last three years will provide pelnty of image quality for the OP's application. This really means nothing for th question which would be the right one to buy..

CheersJens.

'Well, 'Zooming with your feet' is usually a stupid thing as zoom rings are designed for hands.' (Me, 2006)My Homepage: http://www.JensRoesner.de..

Comment #7

I see 2 or 3 posts a day from folks looking for their first DSLR and want to know should I get a Canon xxx or a Nikon xxx or an Olympus xxx or a Sony xxx. So in an attempt to be proactive I decided I'd put this post up for you to read before you post the question. Now I own an Oly and say that for clarity up front. Also I have put up almost the same statements for many posts so here's to being proactive..

Ok everyone likes their camera. So if you post a I'm choosing between the Nikon XXX and the Sony XXX you will generally get more comments that say get the Nikon because there are more Nikon owners. They may be right they may be wrong, so lets cut to the chase..

The least important thing overall in the system, e.g. photographer, camera body, lens, is the camera body. ALL the DSLRs available today will take excellent images. All of them. So you have one variable which is basically a wash unless you want to count pixels, take pictures in very dark rooms without a flash, or whatever..

So we are left with the photographer and lenses. All the manufacturers make good lenses. Canon and Nikon make the most and there are more 3rd party lenses. And you will often see a posting about the "wide variety" of lenses from Nikon and Canon. But honestly how many lenses do you need? There are 32 lenses available for a 4/3 mount at my last count. I think that will cover all of my requirements with about 28 lenses left over.

All of the manufacturer make good quality lenses. However based on what I have read and experienced in the kit lens area Oly and Pentax have the best kit lens quality. There are so many other lenses that it really comes down to value. Can you get equiv quality lenses at the same prices. Generally the answer again is yes.

So in my opinion Oly/Pentax come out slightly ahead here for the kit lensesPlease note I said slightly. For everything else it's a wash..

That leaves us with the most important part of the system...the photographer. YOU have to decide what is the most comfortable system for you. Generally the Oly/Panasonic will have a lighter body and much lighter lenses. Pentax bodies are weather sealed so if you are going outdoors a good deal you may want to consider that. So many people use Canikons that you could be able to borrow lenses etc. Sony and Oly have built in image stabilization.

Does any of this matter to YOU? I don't know and nobody on these forums can make that decision. Some people like a heavier system. I don't but I don't like a really feather weight either. Are the controls where YOU want them? Does the menu make sense to YOU? Can YOU quickly change settings? How's the view finder? Is the camera comfortable for YOU to hold and control. If your 6'10 and have hands like Shak then you most likely will not be comfortable with a small camera.

The MOST important aspect in taking pictures is the PHOTOGRAPHER and his/her knowledge of his/her tools and his/her comfort in using that tool. DON'T put too much thought into the tool. Painters don't stand around admiring each others brushes. They talk technique. I've seen shots with Point and Shoots that are better then anything I can take with my fancy DSLR because the guy/gal that took them has more understanding of composition and has a better eye for what is interesting and they get the most from their tools..

Jim.

Olympus E-510 and a bunch of stuff to hang on it...

Comment #8

Hi Sparkie!.

Thanks for your quick reply! I don't have much experience inphotography except taking pictures of vacations and family eventswith a point and shoot camera..

Okay. So there might be a small risk that you realise that you would like to do a specific type of photography - of which you don't know anything yet. This makes the decision a bit more difficult, so I understand your hesitation to jump in..

I'll probably take pictures of thesame things, but I'd just like to be able to take better lookingphotos..

At the risk of sounding like a hypocrit, you can take great-looking shots with a(n advanced) P&S. Sure, dSLRS focus faster, have lower noise and more flexibility. But this comes at a price, both money-wise and in bulk and ease-of-use. Maybe something like the recent Fuji "bridge" cameras would be okay, too?.

As I responded to another reply, I'm basically looking for an easilyportable (ie. light) camera for basic photos of people and landscape..

If you want to go hiking in wet weather, I suggest looking at weather-protected cameras. Otherwise, none of the dSLRs should have a problem with those things..

I don't think that I will print big regularly. The biggest willprobably be about 10x10 or so for scrapbooking purposes ..

So a 6MP dSLR would be okay. Maybe even a used one..

As far aslenses and accessories, I don't particularly mind buying used... doesit make a difference? (besides cost?).

For some manufacturers, some focal lengths are not readily available new. OTOH, some cameras support using older lenses - which can be interesting for money, art and history..

As far as lenses go, which ones do you think are required (or good tohave) for beginning photographers??.

Well, I like zooms, others prefer primes. But it's hard to predict which type you are, unless you try. Often the kit lens (18-50/55) is so cheap that it can be used for a starting point and then you can make up your mind what you need..

As Maddog says, _you_ are the most crucial element in the system. You need a camera that fits you - both physically and in it's abilities..

Be suspicious of people recommending a camera or even a brand without _really_ knowing what it will be used for..

People generally fall into two sections: Those who are happy with their gear and want other people to join. And people who are unhappy with their gear and want to prevent other people from making the same mistake. You need to filter both, as their needs/wants might be totally different from yours..

CheersJens.

'Well, 'Zooming with your feet' is usually a stupid thing as zoom rings are designed for hands.' (Me, 2006)My Homepage: http://www.JensRoesner.de..

Comment #9

JensR wrote:.

Hi folks!.

IMO, you should either buy a new Nikon D40 with the twin lens kit..

While it takes great pictures, the limited compatibility with olderlenses and the rather strict meaning of "older" here, I am not surethis is the best suggestion. In any case, a prospective buyer shouldresearch these issues before jumping in..

For the OP's needs the D40 is an excellent choice. All AFS, AFI, SIgma HSM and many new Tamrons autofocus on a D40. More lenses than most brands offer entirely. All other Nikon lenes will mount on a D40 going back to 1959 except for a very few rare exceptions. All modern lenses of the type the OP is likely to need will work just fine..

The other choice would be an Olympus 420 or 510 with the twin lenskit. I like the 420 because of it's size, but the 510 has morefeatures and includes stabalization. It should be slightly more thanthe D40. Olympus glass, like Nikon glass, is some of the best in theworld..

There is not a company making bad lenses or bad cameras - you justhave to pick the one that fits your and your application..

Some companies clearly make better glass on the average than others. Nikon and Olympus have a reputation of very few poor choices in consumer or pro-glass..

They are terribly easy to use..

Most dSLRs have automatic modes which make even a D300 easy to use..

Some just make it easier. The D300 defaults in many settings that would need to be changed by someone new to photography. For example, the D300 defaults for not locking the camera when a memory card is not installed. The D300 has no style settings. The D300 has no full auto setting. You might wish to better research this..

Put your eye to the.

Small.

Viewfinderand press the button. Great pics..

No. That's not how photography works. Photography involves thephotographer having skill. _All_ dSLRs produced in the last threeyears will provide pelnty of image quality for the OP's application.This really means nothing for th question which would be the rightone to buy..

BS. Photography does not require that the photographer have skill. That's a techno geek answer. Photography just requres that a camera make a good sharp exposure. Some beginner cameras do that better than others..

What you might have meant is that a great photograph might require skill, artistic expression, tell a story, good technique as well as a myriad of other things. Good luck and timing can be a major factor as well..

The OP answered your question as to what they wanted to do. I answered as to two cameras that filled the bill nicely. They could be out there learnig the craft right now rather than wallowing in techno nonsense. They don't need to know what fisheye made in 1968 won't fit the mirror box of a D40. There's only a few in existance and they're in collections. They don't even need to know that a D40 won't autofocus a 60mm AFD.

By then they will be manually focusing macro..

Anyway, to the Op, just go out there and try a couple of good entry level cameras and start taking pictures. If you decide to move forward in this craft, learn from artist types and don't worry about the gear heads..

Cheers, Craig..

Comment #10

For the OP's needs the D40 is an excellent choice..

I don't think so.To the OP:The D40 has:no AF with many great AF lenses, including several nice big-aperture primes.

No metering with non-AF lenses, including many manual focus gems by Nikkor themselves.no mirror lock-up (MLU/mirror pre-flip) for blur-reduced shots from a tripodno Depth-of-field preview to judge the effect of stopping down.no wired (or radio) remote, just IR..

If those are non-issues to you, the D40 will be a great camera for you. But if you think you might need those features eventually, you might want to look elsewhere..

All modern lenses of the type the OP is likely toneed will work just fine..

The OP himself does not even know which way he will go and yet you seem to know and suggest the camera with the worst backwards-compatibility on the market. Hmmm..

There is not a company making bad lenses or bad cameras - you justhave to pick the one that fits your and your application..

Some companies clearly make better glass on the average than others.Nikon and Olympus have a reputation of very few poor choices inconsumer or pro-glass..

There are duds in any lens-maker's portfolio. I simply do not agree with you singling out those two for being above the rest..

They are terribly easy to use..

Most dSLRs have automatic modes which make even a D300 easy to use..

Some just make it easier..

Sure..

And the D40 is one of those easy-makers? Or maybe it makes things easy just because it limits the things you can do with it? And I don't mean this in the "greatness comes from reduction" sense, but in the way of "throwing branches between your legs"..

The D300 defaults in many settings thatwould need to be changed by someone new to photography. For example,the D300 defaults for not locking the camera when a memory card isnot installed. The D300 has no style settings. The D300 has no fullauto setting. You might wish to better research this..

#hahahahahah##wipes away tears#Good one. Thanks..

So, you reckon style settings are necessary for someone who has decided to take photography a bit more seriously? You might wish to better research this. And what do you mean with "no full auto"? Last time I checked, the D300 had:-auto selection of AutoFocus point-auto programme exposure-auto ISOWhat do you want more?.

To the OP: I am neither suggesting that you buy a D300, nor that you don't buy one..

Put your eye to the.

Small.

Viewfinderand press the button. Great pics..

No. That's not how photography works. Photography involves thephotographer having skill. _All_ dSLRs produced in the last threeyears will provide pelnty of image quality for the OP's application.This really means nothing for th question which would be the rightone to buy..

BS..

How elaborate .

Photography does not require that the photographer have skill.That's a techno geek answer. Photography just requres that a cameramake a good sharp exposure. Some beginner cameras do that better thanothers..

What you might have meant is that a great photograph might requireskill, artistic expression, tell a story, good technique as well as amyriad of other things. Good luck and timing can be a major factor aswell..

You said "great pics". I think my reply was a good match to your claim that the camera takes "great pics". Maybe you should have defined what you mean by "great pics" and "photography". You obviously meant "sharp and well-exposed". Now, that's a techno-geek definition if I ever saw one .

The OP answered your question as to what they wanted to do. Ianswered as to two cameras that filled the bill nicely..

No. You submitted two cameras of which you think that they fit the bill nicely and I disagree..

They could beout there learnig the craft right now rather than wallowing in technononsense. They don't need to know what fisheye made in 1968 won't fitthe mirror box of a D40. There's only a few in existance and they'rein collections..

Nice red herring!.

Anyway, to the Op, just go out there and try a couple of good entrylevel cameras and start taking pictures. If you decide to moveforward in this craft, learn from artist types and don't worry aboutthe gear heads..

Or -better yet- listen to those who are good at both .

CheersJens.

'Well, 'Zooming with your feet' is usually a stupid thing as zoom rings are designed for hands.' (Me, 2006)My Homepage: http://www.JensRoesner.de..

Comment #11

As an amateur photographer that just bought my first dSLR I would say definitely don't overbuy. A lot of people who have little knowledge of photography and are buying their first dSLR go out and purchase some $1,000 or more dSLR because some professional or enthusiast photographer radles off all these extra features it has but once you buy it and have it for a few weeks you you start to realize that most or possibly even all of those additional features are things you could of easily lived without. Any new dSLR nowadays, even the cheapest entry level cameras, can take excellent pictures. It's just going to mostly depend upon you learning how to actually take photographs with it and choosing the right lenses for your situation..

That said I purchased the Nikon D60 myself because after reading reviews and user opinions it seemed like it was the best dSLR in it's price range. No it doesn't have all the features of the D80 which costs a few hundred more but it has all the features I need, especially with it being my first camera. I chose it over the D40 because I think the added MP would be beneficial to me. I was able to get it for a real nice price off eBay when the Microsoft Live cashback program just started with 35% cashback...

Comment #12

Nice choice. I know you'll enjoy the great images that camera can take.Cheers, Craig..

Comment #13

I'm just not going to answer some of this silliness. It becomes way too pedantic at this point..

There is not a company making bad lenses or bad cameras - you justhave to pick the one that fits your and your application..

Some companies clearly make better glass on the average than others.Nikon and Olympus have a reputation of very few poor choices inconsumer or pro-glass..

There are duds in any lens-maker's portfolio. I simply do not agreewith you singling out those two for being above the rest..

Well, again, this is my opinion. I'll challenge you to name me some current dogs in the Olympus or Nikon lineup. You're a bit of a gear head. Tell me about your current crop of Pentax lenses. Is there a couple in there that have no peer in the Nikon or Oly lineup. We're talking optics and build quality.

Optics and build quality. Does Pentax have any dogs in there?.

The D300 defaults in many settings thatwould need to be changed by someone new to photography. For example,the D300 defaults for not locking the camera when a memory card isnot installed. The D300 has no style settings. The D300 has no fullauto setting. You might wish to better research this..

#hahahahahah##wipes away tears#Good one. Thanks.So, you reckon style settings are necessary for someone who hasdecided to take photography a bit more seriously? You might wish tobetter research this. And what do you mean with "no full auto"? Last time I checked, theD300 had:-auto selection of AutoFocus point-auto programme exposure-auto ISOWhat do you want more?To the OP: I am neither suggesting that you buy a D300, nor that youdon't buy one..

I said I wouldn't answer the silly responses, but I will this one. You know what the full auto choice is. It's not a combination of automatic settings and it's not the defaullt setting on a camera like the D300. There is no "auto" on the dial that controls everyting including popping the flash like there is on most entry level cameras. Now, be polite..

If you don't agree with someone, make your own suggestions. Your attempt at ad hominem argument and silly "wiping of eyes" reduces your credibility, as does your pedantic manner. It's also very tiresome..

Cheers, Craig..

Comment #14

To the OP; although both Guidenet and jensR are trying to help, I wouldn't let them distract you too much. As a beginner, it could be nice just to buy a kit-lens and when you might decide later on that you are limited by your gear, You just buy another lens..

I don't think there is any brand out there that has got a shortage of lenses, although, when I read the Photozone.de reviews of the Sony lenses, they're quite bad, but we're talking image quality and build here. Not usability, which is the main concern for your first System..

It is wise though to limit yourself financially. Just set a desirable amount for yourself and go to the shop to see what system you could buy for that money..

Right now you probably don't know whether you want compatibility with an older prime, flash or anything like that. You'll find out and when you do want to use that exotic fish-eye, you're probably fed-up with your entry-level gear as well...

Comment #15

There are duds in any lens-maker's portfolio. I simply do not agreewith you singling out those two for being above the rest..

Well, again, this is my opinion. I'll challenge you to name me somecurrent dogs in the Olympus or Nikon lineup. You're a bit of a gearhead..

How would you know?.

But since you asked, the Nikon 24-120 VR is soft, the 70-200/2.8 is a joke to be sold as an FF lens and much of the Olympus line-up is very good but overpriced. But, that's my opinion. .

Tell me about your current crop of Pentax lenses..

The lenses that I have or the ones Pentax offers? Why do you use the word "your"? I don't belong to Pentax. _I_ didn't bring up my personal favourite brand as a suggestion for the OP, that was you. Oh, and I am not saying Pentax is my favourite brand..

Is there acouple in there that have no peer in the Nikon or Oly lineup..

Sure. Absolutely. But likewise, Nikon has some where Pentax has no peer for. So, one would need to know what one likes to make an informed decision or suggestion..

We're talking optics and build quality. Don't hedge off in anotherdirection like Pentax has a green stripe or makes a pancake size..

So you are limiting the playing field arbitrarily, as if there are no good reasons why someone likes or even needs pancakes. I hope your shot at the green stripe gave you some giggles, but it is not constructive at all..

Optics and build quality. Does Pentax have any dogs in there?.

All current Pentax lenses are well worth their money, that is my definition of "not a dog". Now, back in film time, there were some rather bad lenses, but currently, there are no duds that I would know of. Oh, wait, the 16-50 had quality problems in the early batches, but that has been ironed out. Shouldn't have happened, but happens to other brands, too..

-auto selection of AutoFocus point-auto programme exposure-auto ISOWhat do you want more?.

I said I wouldn't answer the silly responses,.

Hey, if _I_ would live up to that promise, we wouldn't have this discussion at all .

But I will this one..

Thank you so much. As a kind of reimbursement, I will reply to the rest of your post, too .

You know what the full auto choice is. It's not a combination ofautomatic settings and it's not the defaullt setting on a camera likethe D300. There is no "auto" on the dial that controls everytingincluding popping the flash like there is on most entry levelcameras..

Yes, it doesn't have an "auto" setting on a _dial_. Glad _I_ am the pedantic here .

Now, be polite..

You started the impoliteness and are continuing it by calling my replies silly and calling me names. Good job of having the nerves to order me to be polite in that situation..

If you don't agree with someone, make your own suggestions..

I reject that. I have explained why I won't make a direct suggestion. This doesn't mean I can't challenge someone else's suggestion. I gave reasons why I think you suggestions are bad ones. You gave reasons why you think they are good. It is up to the OP to decide whose arguments are the better ones..

Your attempt at ad hominem argument.

Cheap shot. You started calling me nasty stuff. It's here for all to see. Accusing me of ad hominems is not a good way to defend yourself..

And silly "wiping of eyes" reduces your credibility,.

Making a joke reduces credibility? What a tough and sober world we are living in..

As does your pedantic manner..

Some call it pedantic, some call it exact. .

It's also very tiresome..

I agree. It looked like fun in the beginning, but not any more..

I hope my "pedantic" "gearhead" replies were "silly" "BS" enough for you to not feel the need to perpetuate this..

CheersJens.

'Well, 'Zooming with your feet' is usually a stupid thing as zoom rings are designed for hands.' (Me, 2006)My Homepage: http://www.JensRoesner.de..

Comment #16

Hi Bart!.

To the OP; although both Guidenet and jensR are trying to help,.

At least initially....

I wouldn't let them distract you too much..

Right!.

As a beginner, it could benice just to buy a kit-lens and when you might decide later on thatyou are limited by your gear, You just buy another lens..

Not a bad plan. But the problem is of course anticipating which direction one's photography will take..

I don't think there is any brand out there that has got a shortage oflenses, although, when I read the Photozone.de reviews of the Sonylenses, they're quite bad, but we're talking image quality and buildhere. Not usability, which is the main concern for your first System..

I disagree partly. While useability is a main concern, I think that the system should be able to support future developments. If someone feels that the Sony system will not support his/her future goals, buying into Sony, because it is good enough to start seems like a bad idea. Switching systems can be a tedious and expensive thing, depending on _when_ you realise that you bought the wrong one..

It is wise though to limit yourself financially. Just set a desirableamount for yourself and go to the shop to see what system you couldbuy for that money..

Good suggestion..

Right now you probably don't know whether you want compatibility withan older prime, flash or anything like that. You'll find out and whenyou do want to use that exotic fish-eye, you're probably fed-up withyour entry-level gear as well..

Maybe. Maybe not. And it is one thing to buy a new better body and another to change the system. There are enough dSLRs which can cater for the beginner and the advanced amateur alike..

CheersJens.

'Well, 'Zooming with your feet' is usually a stupid thing as zoom rings are designed for hands.' (Me, 2006)My Homepage: http://www.JensRoesner.de..

Comment #17

I agree with Guidenet that the Nikon d40/60 or Oly are great choices for a beginner..

Just want to emphasize a few points that have may have already been made..

The lens is more important than the camera body. Lenses are considered an investment whereas bodies are somewhat disposable in that you may want to upgrade sooner than you think due to changes in technology. If money is not a factor (lucky you), start looking at the lenses in Nikon/Oly (also Canon, Pentax maybe Sony) lineup and then decide on the brand...

Comment #18

Sparkiex112 wrote:.

I've heard that canon and nikon are the best,.

Just because a lot of people use a particular brand, doesn't make it the best. In my own case of choosing a camera, Canon and Nikon were crossed off my list in the first round (out of three rounds of weeding out cameras that weren't good enough for my needs)..

As well each person thinks their camera is best on the market, but what they are really saying is what's best for them...you should choose what's best for you...

Comment #19

Sparkiex112 wrote:.

Hi! I'm looking to buy a slr camera that will hopefully last for awhile. If the price isn't an issue, which camera would you recommend.

My jaw just dropped. "If price is not an issue?" Huh? This isn't like a range of USD 50 to USD 300. The cheapest DSLR with lens is relatively cheap vs a top body which is USD 5000, not including lenses. On all of these DSLR, the lenses can be cheaper or be USD 5000, USD 10000..

Price is always and issue and should be used as a criteria..

Purchasing? I've heard that canon and nikon are the best, but thereare so many options between them and wonder if getting the highestmodel is a safe buy, or a waste (for a beginning slr user?) Thanksfor your help!.

Here's the deal:.

1. If you are a beginner and you don't know the difference between aperture, shutter speed, ISO, then a good idea is to buy a DSLR with one or two standard lenses. You can learn with this package and then progress by getting a more expensive body..

2. The lenses contribute as much or more to your photos than the body..

2. Be sure you want a DSLR because that type of camera rewards you if you take the time to plan, effort to set up the shot and then a little tweaking of the images after you shoot. If right now, you think this is asking a lot from you, stay with a prosumer camera which requires less effort or you can put more effort and still get more reward from this..

Here is something to think about:.

Http://anandasim.blogspot.com/2008/07/which-dslr-shall-i-buy.htmlhttp://anandasim.blogspot.com/...08/07/point-and-shoot-vs-dslr-which-one.html.

Anandahttp://anandasim.blogspot.com/..

Comment #20

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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