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B&W /w DSLR
I would like to start shooting in B&W as my primary medium. My Canon 5D allows me to shoot in pure monochrome (B&W) via the camera's menu option..

Since I may not have the opportunity to capture the same shot twice, should I shoot in color and then do B&W thru Photoshop OR should I shoot in B&W via the camera?.

My thinking is that Photoshop is so good now that removing color shouldn't be a problem but are there any obvious or noticeable differences when shooting in pure monochrome via the camera?.

Thanks-Nick..

Comments (12)

If you do a proper B&W conversion in Photoshop you will notice the same if not better results.The in camera setting for B&W is just that, a setting like in PP..

The other reason I myself shoot in color is because sometimes I dont want to remove all color from a B&W picture. Ill either leave the eyes or the lips or a flower colored...

But if you are going out to shoot only B&W then you might as well save some time and shoot B&W right off the bat...uhh camera. ..

Comment #1

I, personally would shoot in color and then remove it later..

There are a lot of ways to get to B&W from a color image and all of them result in a different looking picture..

I don't use Photoshop but as I recall there are several B&W actions and plug-ins that can be used for B&W conversion..

I know that Lightroom (which I do have) has several and the results are dramatically different.Go with max flexability.A member of the rabble in good standing...

Comment #2

LM1 wrote:.

I, personally would shoot in color and then remove it later.There are a lot of ways to get to B&W from a color image and all ofthem result in a different looking picture.I don't use Photoshop but as I recall there are several B&W actionsand plug-ins that can be used for B&W conversion.I know that Lightroom (which I do have) has several and the resultsare dramatically different.Go with max flexability.A member of the rabble in good standing..

As far as I know all the cameras with B&W settings are actually shooting color and making the conversion in the camera. No doubt SOMEWHERE there is a camera to prove me wrong..

But, as far as I know, such is the case. Photoshop or other programs can do a better job of this than the camera..

Of course if all you're interested in is "snapshots," what the heck.... .

Dave..

Comment #3

As the other respondents have stated, shoot in color then convert to B&W. Primarily because this lets you get the best B&W rendition possible. If shooting using the camera's B&W mode, you only get one possible outcome. What the camera chose for you..

By doing your own conversions you have control over what colors map to what tones. (More or less) Of course it is more work. Probably the best suggestion is to try it both ways and compare your results. You may find that the camera makes very good B&W images. Just hope you never need one of them in color. Colorization is a lot more difficult than the reverse.



Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #4

I agree, shoot color and then use pp to remove it.dcr1998http://www.pbase.com/dcr1998..

Comment #5

If image quality is paramount, then shoot Raw (which is always color) and convert to B&W either in your Raw converter or in your editor..

The reasons to shoot in-camera B&W JPEG are related to the gestalt of the process, not to the quality of the finished product. My thoughts on that can be found here:http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1019&message=22978095..

Comment #6

I agree to shoot in color too, but I shot some B/W's - while playing/testing the cam - which I would deleted for sure when shot in color.... I even ordered a big print of it..

Also, for me time is an issue (to PP) so I shoot sometimes B/W's when the mood asks for it..

Cheers,http://www.pbase.com/tantebes/root.

Danny..

Comment #7

Chato wrote:.

As far as I know all the cameras with B&W settings are actuallyshooting color and making the conversion in the camera. No doubtSOMEWHERE there is a camera to prove me wrong.Dave.

While there was a Kodak that was a B&W only camera (an expensive DSLR with no Bayer filter), the way you worded your statement leaves it still correct.A member of the rabble in good standing...

Comment #8

Thanks for all the responses..

Yes, I do plan to 'think' B&W while I'm out shooting... but I also understand that time is very valuable these days and you may not get another shot..

I went out and took a few pictures in color and converted them to B&W with Adobe Lightroom... seems to work very nicely..

I also have discovered a new justification for buying another Canon dSLR! .

-Nick..

Comment #9

If speed to output is important, fine shoot b&w in-camera. But as all others have stated, your control over the conversion is much greater, and with greatly noticeable results IMHO..

I've tried a lot of methods, and now use Daniel Diaz's conversion method, made into a Photoshop action by Matthew Greer. Here's Matthew's blog full of b&w conversion info goodness:http://mgreerphoto.blogspot.com/.../2007/01/black-and-white-conversions.html.

The link to download the DD action is there..

I add a few tweaks, but that's one great action. I rely on it. YMMV..

Cheers.Davidmy flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/prodesma/my website: http://kaptures.net/..

Comment #10

I shoot with the camera (D80) set on b/w mode and shoot in RAW..

That way I can judge how tones are working with review on the camera, if I like what the camera has done I can just export a TIFF from the Nikon software and because it's a RAW I can still use the colour info for editing..

Best of both worlds...

Comment #11

Phototext wrote:.

I shoot with the camera (D80) set on b/w mode and shoot in RAW..

That way I can judge how tones are working with review on the camera,if I like what the camera has done I can just export a TIFF from theNikon software and because it's a RAW I can still use the colour infofor editing..

Best of both worlds..

Yes, that's exactly what I do with my D200 (and Panasonic LX2 as well)..

Alex..

Comment #12

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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