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?? on saving RAW files
Hi,.

Is it advisable to save RAW file with adjusted WB or just save the RAW file without the adjustment? I don't wanna go back through the hassle of figuring out the WB balance all over again when I re-open the files someday. It's just too much work IMO...

Comments (12)

Depends on your raw converter..

Some allow you to make changes to the camera's settings changing how the file is converted negating the need to worry about WB or any other parameter in the field. I like being able to go back and use settings other than my normal if I feel it suits a photo better..

If you want you can set everything right in cam. Makes batch processing easier and the image preview closer to the final product..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #1

BA baracus wrote:.

If you want you can set everything right in cam. Makes batchprocessing easier and the image preview closer to the final product..

Thanks for replying, but I don't get this part that you wrote. I'm shooting in RAW and set my WB to "auto". I have to re-adjust my WB on all of my RAW images in DPP. My question is after getting the right color (WB) on the RAW images, should I save them as is...i.e.....RAW + corrected WB OR original RAW only?..

Comment #2

I don't see the 'RAW + corrected WB' as an option in the current version of DPP, 3.4.1.1, perhaps this is an earlier version. I suggest you check your version and download the update if needed..

In 3.4.1.1, any adjustments you make are saved with the RAW, but do not modify the RAW data. So when you open the file in the future all of the adjustments, including WB are applied as the starting point. I think this is what you're after..

Spade357 wrote:.

BA baracus wrote:.

If you want you can set everything right in cam. Makes batchprocessing easier and the image preview closer to the final product..

Thanks for replying, but I don't get this part that you wrote. I'mshooting in RAW and set my WB to "auto". I have to re-adjust my WBon all of my RAW images in DPP. My question is after getting theright color (WB) on the RAW images, should I save them asis...i.e.....RAW + corrected WB OR original RAW only?.

Best regards,Doughttp://pbase.com/dougj..

Comment #3

Spade357 wrote:.

Hi,.

Is it advisable to save RAW file with adjusted WB or just save theRAW file without the adjustment? I don't wanna go back through thehassle of figuring out the WB balance all over again when I re-openthe files someday. It's just too much work IMO..

Do you wanna (ugh!) tell us which software and which DSLR? I don't wanna (shudder!) waste my time guessing..

With Nikon RAW (NEF) and Capture NX the program reads the camera settings and applies them automatically unless you change them. IF you chose to change any of the settings (including WB) it will open the file with those changed settings but they can be changed again with just a click. Further you can save as many different versions of the photo each with different setings as you wish. None of them will permanently alter the basic RAW material..

So your question makes little sense to a Capture NX user. Presumably you are shooting Canon? (Might be helpful to say don't you think?) But how on earth are we supposed to know which software you are using?.

Chris Elliott.

*Nikon* D Eighty + Fifty - Other equipment in Profile.

Http://PlacidoD.Zenfolio.com/..

Comment #4

He said in his second post that he is using (Canon) DPP.Chris R..

Comment #5

I assume you are asking about saving your RAW files with the ADJUSTED WB to where you want it in DPP..

If so, then saving RAW in this way is absolutely fine. It does not degrade the image, no matter how many times you do it, and if at any time you want to go back to the ORIGINAL WB setting (or any other setting for that matter) you can reset it in DPP..

This is the beauty of RAW versus JPEG. With JPEG, the camera settings are used to create an image that can be viewed on a monitor and FORM AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE IMAGE whereas with RAW, you are saving exactly what the sensor saw with the camera settings forming a SEPARATE FILE to tell the RAW converter how to create the image...

Comment #6

I should add that only DPP can read the adjustments you have made and saved with the RAW file. Other programs, e.g. Photoshop, etc., can not read these and the file will appear unaltered when opened..

DPP has another feature you may not be aware of. Once you decide on a set of parameters for the conversion of a RAW file, you can save the adjustments as a separate 'recipe'. You can then batch convert a group of files using the same adjustments..

Best regards,Doughttp://pbase.com/dougj..

Comment #7

Doug J wrote:.

I should add that only DPP can read the adjustments you have made andsaved with the RAW file. Other programs, e.g. Photoshop, etc., cannot read these and the file will appear unaltered when opened..

It is generally true that the conversion program supplied by the camera manufacturer can interpret all of the image settings *in the camera*, producing results roughly equivalent to a JPG taken at the same moment, and other converters cannot..

One important exception is that camera setting of White Balance *is* available to (for example) Adobe Camera Raw and therefore to Photoshop. To access this, there is an "As Shot" button above the ACR WB and Tint sliders..

However, settings you adjust *in the converter* are almost always stored, and recalled when you next come back to the same image with the same converter. This may be put inside the Raw file itself, or else in a separate "sidecar" file, or in some cases the converter program keeps track of this. Except for the third of these options, different converters can usually "read" most of each others' stored settings including crop, rotation, "exposure" etc - though the terminology may differ slightly..

RP..

Comment #8

Spade357 wrote:.

Hi,.

Is it advisable to save RAW file with adjusted WB or just save theRAW file without the adjustment? I don't wanna go back through thehassle of figuring out the WB balance all over again when I re-openthe files someday. It's just too much work IMO..

My interpretation of what you are saying is that you have already 'finished' a given photo and wouldn't likely revisit a raw image again. Woudn't it be better to archive the finished image as a tif, jpg, or even psd file, where all those settings are more permanently fixed? I'm not saying don't archive the raw, but why revisit the raw when you don't have to?.

In my opinion, the only reason to revisit a 'finished' raw file is if you want to make radically new changes to an older image. In which case, what difference does it make? At that point all your old settings are on the table again anyway..

Now I don't use DPP or Canon digital cameras (other than a much beloved G3) and I'm using Lightroom, so my understanding of the workflow may be off, but I find worrying over this somewhat puzzling.STOP Global Stasis! Change is good!.

Now that you've judged the quality of my typing, take a look at my photos..http://www.photo.net/photos/GlenBarrington.

And my non Photo blog:http://blog.360.yahoo.com/blog-Qe0Iq3g2d6ML3IynXl.Q2i5CPe6UaA?cq=1..

Comment #9

Glen Barrington wrote:.

My interpretation of what you are saying is that you have already'finished' a given photo and wouldn't likely revisit a raw imageagain. Woudn't it be better to archive the finished image as a tif,jpg, or even psd file, where all those settings are more permanentlyfixed? I'm not saying don't archive the raw, but why revisit the rawwhen you don't have to?.

In my opinion, the only reason to revisit a 'finished' raw file is ifyou want to make radically new changes to an older image. In whichcase, what difference does it make? At that point all your oldsettings are on the table again anyway..

Now I don't use DPP or Canon digital cameras (other than a muchbeloved G3) and I'm using Lightroom, so my understanding of theworkflow may be off, but I find worrying over this somewhat puzzling..

The reason I wanted to save my RAW files is because I'm still fairly new to image editing and not quite sure if my edited pictures are correct (i.e. color could be off due to monitor calibration or just bad editing skills) so I wanted to be able to come back later on to the original files and re-edit them..

By the way, thanks for all posts guys, I just figured out that DPP only saves the edited RAW temporarily while you're in the program and other programs won't be able to read it, my mistake guys...

Comment #10

My comments were specific to the question asked by the OP relative to DPP, and not other converters or editing programs, or how they usually work. This is specific to DPP..

DPP will read the as-shot settings, including WB, and apply these to the file when it is opened. The user may make adjustments and save the raw file, the adjustments are then, and only then, saved within the RAW, without modifying the RAW data itself. Unlike PS, RAW adjustments are not automatically saved in a separate file..

These user adjustments in DPP, including WB, are not read by programs other than DPP. This is specifically true with PS CS, CS2 and CS3, Irfanview, the other program supplied by Canon that performs Raw conversion - ZoomBrowser..

I hope this provides clarification on DPP, it differs from other converters in several ways..

Richardplondon wrote:.

Doug J wrote:.

I should add that only DPP can read the adjustments you have made andsaved with the RAW file. Other programs, e.g. Photoshop, etc., cannot read these and the file will appear unaltered when opened..

It is generally true that the conversion program supplied by thecamera manufacturer can interpret all of the image settings *in thecamera*, producing results roughly equivalent to a JPG taken at thesame moment, and other converters cannot..

One important exception is that camera setting of White Balance *is*available to (for example) Adobe Camera Raw and therefore toPhotoshop. To access this, there is an "As Shot" button above the ACRWB and Tint sliders..

However, settings you adjust *in the converter* are almost alwaysstored, and recalled when you next come back to the same image withthe same converter. This may be put inside the Raw file itself, orelse in a separate "sidecar" file, or in some cases the converterprogram keeps track of this. Except for the third of these options,different converters can usually "read" most of each others' storedsettings including crop, rotation, "exposure" etc - though theterminology may differ slightly..

RP.

Best regards,Doughttp://pbase.com/dougj..

Comment #11

Spade357 wrote:.

By the way, thanks for all posts guys, I just figured out that DPPonly saves the edited RAW temporarily while you're in the program andother programs won't be able to read it, my mistake guys..

This is a difference between PS & DPP. You can make any adjustments you desire and then 'save' the RAW file without actually changing the RAW data. But it must be saved..

I suggest you update DPP to the latest version, it has some nice new features and Canon has expanded the list of lenses it will recognize and do corrections for..

Best regards,Doughttp://pbase.com/dougj..

Comment #12

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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